Sociable

Monday, June 14, 2010

Saturday Night at the Movies

Over the weekend I finally saw Sex and the City II. Clearly, this flickSATC2 targets me, a huge fan of the original show. The movie also touched on issues discussed in the blogosphere last week.
Charlotte, at the end of the first movie, held her newborn daughter. Rose has now moved into the “terrible twos,” and Charlotte is overwhelmed, even with a full-time nanny. The nanny, a young hot Irish woman, eschews certain items of lingerie; she becomes “Erin Go Braless,” as a result. When first we meet Ms. Erin, Samantha suggests Charlotte should keep an eye on her husband around the nanny.
Crying
Between Rose, who cries and fusses constantly, and Lily, her adopted daughter, Charlotte has her hands full (although why she tries to ice cupcakes in a cream-colored vintage Valentino pencil skirt is beyond my understanding). After the action moves to a luxury resort in the middle east, Charlotte and Miranda, the other mother in the group, commiserate about raising kids. Charlotte’s big confession? When Samantha said something about her husband and the nanny, her first thought was, “Oh my god, we can’t lose the nanny!” Remember, Charlotte stays at home with the children and has full-time help.
These mothers have not forgotten that they are wealthy and have excellent support. Their assets do not keep them from feeling overwhelmed by caring for their offspring! They cannot figure out how women do it without their resources – and finally they drink a toast to those moms.
Miranda finds herself “between jobs” at this point in the  movie. She makes another confession in this scene. Although she loves her son more than anything in the whole world, she misses working. She is a lawyer, and she wants to retain her sense of herself. Motherhood and her career are both parts of her, and neither should be excluded from her life.
I remember when my son was born; he also fussed a lot, and he slept no more than 2 hours at a stretch for the first 3 months of his life. I sent his older sister to daycare (we had to pay for it to keep her spot), even though I was on leave. I do not know how all of us would have survived if I had her at home, waking me up every time I finally got Tim to doze.
Later that night, I toasted all those moms who raise kids without my resources- I don't know how they do it!
My 22-year-old daughter accompanied me to the movie; she turned to me as the lights came up and said that it was worth every minute and every penny we spent on it. “And I know you have blog ideas for the next week or so.”
Yup. Stay tuned.
Click on photos to see on original sites.

2 comments:

  1. Did you like the movie? It got really harsh reviews across the board. I love harsh reviews because they are very enjoyable to read. This one was my favorite:
    http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/burkas-and-birkins/Content?oid=4132715

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  2. Harsh reviews are always more fun to read; however, we both loved the movie. Yes, there were some ridiculous things, like the number of costume changes during the desert picnic and Samantha's refusal to follow any wardrobe rules. All in all, they could have developed a couple of the themes (making your own rules for marriage, taking away the voice of women, and the pains of motherhood) and eliminated some silly stuff. I'm not certain why Carrie had to run into Aiden in the suk; that whole bit could have been left out.
    Frankly, we would have been happy with just the gay wedding peformed by Liza Minnelli - that first half an hour left us peeing our pants!

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